First there was the Second Amendment Preservation Act, a bill floated in a number of conservative statehouses in recent months that would make it a crime for U.S. government officials to enforce federal gun laws within their state boundaries.

Now comes the Fourth Amendment Protection Act.

It’s the name of a ripped-from-the-headlines bill introduced by state lawmakers in California on Monday.

It would ban state agencies and officials from helping the federal government collect electronic data and metadata on Americans without a targeted warrant. And it would prohibit state and local law enforcement authorities from using such data in their investigations and prosecutions.

Lawmakers in Arizona and Oklahoma are drafting similar measures — all of them based on model bill language crafted by the Los Angeles-based Tenth Amendment Center, the same states’ rights advocacy group that also spearheaded the Second Amendment protection lobbying campaign.

In a lively-worded statement, Sen. Ted Lieu, a Democrat from Redondo Beach who sponsored the bill, described it as an “essential” guard against privacy abuses, decrying the National Security Agency’s spy programs as a “direct threat to our liberty and freedom.”

Read more via California, Other States, Weighing Anti-NSA Bills – Law Blog – WSJ.

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